PEACE ECONOMICS

Academic Year 2021/2022 - 2° Year

Course Structure

written and oral


Required Prerequisites

none


Attendance of Lessons

mandatory



Course Planning

 SubjectsReferences to Textbooks
1Introduction to Peace Ecoomics and EconomicsFrank, R. (2014) Microeconomics and Behaviours, NY, MCGraw Hills, Chapters 1 and 2, pp. 3-54. 
2Demand Schedule, Supply schedule, Market equilibriumFrank, R. (2014) Microeconomics and Behaviours, NY, MCGraw Hills, Chapters 1 and 2, pp. 3-54. 
3Production Function, Costs CurvesFrank, R. (2014) Microeconomics and Behaviours, NY, MCGraw Hills, Chapters 8 and 9, pp. 248-316. 
4Perfect Competitive MarketsFrank, R. (2014) Microeconomics and Behaviours, NY, MCGraw Hills, Chapter 10, pp. 317-354. 
5Productive and unproductive activities. Caruso R. (2010), On the nature of peace economics, Peace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy, 16, No. 2.  
6History of Peace Economics https://www.researchgate.net/publication/239809814_Peace_economists_and_peace_economics) 
7Economic policies for peace • Caruso R. (2017), Peace economics and peaceful policies, The Economics of Peace and Security Journal, Vol. 12, No. 2 ) 
8Economic policies for peace • Caruso R. (2017), Peace economics and peaceful policies, The Economics of Peace and Security Journal, Vol. 12, No. 2 ) 
9Negative peace and positive peace • Caruso R. (2015) Beyond deterrence and decline towards a general understanding of peace economics, Rivista Internazionale di Scienze Sociali, 123, No. 1) 
10Negative peace and positive peace• Caruso R. (2015) Beyond deterrence and decline towards a general understanding of peace economics, Rivista Internazionale di Scienze Sociali, 123, No. 1) 
11Specific issues of peace economics: CLIMATE CHANGEBuhaug H., (2016), The climate change and the security threaten. Climate Change and Conflict: Taking Stock , in Peace, Peace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy, Vol. 22, No. 4) 
12Specific issues of peace economics: GENDER INEQUALITIES• Gizelis T.I. (2018), Systematic Study of Gender, Conflict, and Peace, Peace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy, 24, No. 4. 
13Keynes and The Economic Consequence of Peace • Keynes, J. M. (1919), The Economic Consequences of the Peace (1 ed.). London: Macmillan & Co., Limited. p. 279. Retrieved 2 June 2016 – via Internet Archive. Chapters 1, 2 and 3) 
14Keynes and The Economic Consequence of Peace• Keynes, J. M. (1919), The Economic Consequences of the Peace (1 ed.). London: Macmillan & Co., Limited. p. 279. Retrieved 2 June 2016 – via Internet Archive. Chapters 4 and 5) 
15Keynes and The Economic Consequence of Peace• Keynes, J. M. (1919), The Economic Consequences of the Peace (1 ed.). London: Macmillan & Co., Limited. p. 279. Retrieved 2 June 2016 – via Internet Archive. Chapters 6 and 7) 
16Specific issues of peace economics A lesson to be organized according to students’ suggestions and needs. 
17Inequality in Societies in Historical PerspectivePiketty, T. (2017). Capital in XXI Century, Harvard University Press, Introdution & Chapter 1. 
18Inequality in Societies in Historical PerspectivePiketty, T. (2017). Capital in XXI Century, Harvard University Press, Introdution & Chapter 1. 
19Inequality in Societies in Historical PerspectivePiketty, T. (2017). Capital in XXI Century, Harvard University Press, Introdution & Chapter 1. 
20Inequalities and ConcentrationPiketty, T. (2017). Capital in XXI Century, Harvard University Press, Chapter 7. 
21Inequality, Merit and Heritage in the Long RunnPiketty, T. (2017). Capital in XXI Century, Harvard University Press, Chapter 10. 
22Understanding Trends in Violent Conflict • World Bank and United Nations (2018), Pathways for Peace Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflict, The World Bank Group, Washington DC - Chapters 1 and 2) 
23Inequality, exclusion and sense of injustice: why people fight • World Bank and United Nations (2018), Pathways for Peace Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflict, The World Bank Group, Washington DC - Chapters 3 and 4) 
24Countries’ approach to prevent violent conflict • World Bank and United Nations (2018), Pathways for Peace Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflict, The World Bank Group, Washington DC - Chapters 5 and 6) 
25Prevention in practice and organizations for prevention World Bank and United Nations (2018), Pathways for Peace Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflict, The World Bank Group, Washington DC - Chapters 7 and 8) 
26active learning proposalno reading is expected for this class 
27FIELDWORKno extra reading is expected for this class 

LEARNING ASSESSMENT

Learning Assessment methods

written and oral examination

Active participation is considered essential to this class and is evaluated as much as one third of the final score (10/30): one minute papers, presentations, mutual interactions, group of studies are key ingredients to the learning targets of the corse.

One third of the final vote is obtained with the oral exam (10/30) and one thir with the written exam (10/30).


Examples of frequently Questions and / or Exercises

  1. Different interpretations of unproductive activities in Baumol’s (1982) reading and in Bhagwati’s (1990) reading.
  2. Discuss the definition of peace economics provided by Isard (1994) and confront it with that proposed by Boulding (1978),
  3. Describe Festinger’s theory of cognitive dissonance and its relevance for peace economics.
  4. Definition of contested and uncontested sectors.
  5. Provide few examples of countries experiencing the resource course. (suggestion: integrate with kwoledges drawn from Pathway to Peace).
  6. Provide a short description for conflict economics, security economics and military economics and show the difference with peace economics.
  7. Provide examples of peace economists and peace economic policies.
  8. The boulding triangle.
  9. The systems of threat.
  10. The integrative system.
  11. Give a spacial representation of the World Bank, the ECB, the commercial bank wher your own current account is open in the Boulding’s triangle framework.
  12. Taking into account that peace economics is not about the absence of war, but its core is the active policies to be implemented in order to obtain peaceful societies, describe the three crucial lines for potential policymaking suggested by Caruso (2017).
  13. Is military expenditure beneficial or detrimental for economic growth? describe Caruso’s (2015) arguments.
  14. Explain why climate change is meant to be an issue for peace economics (suggestion: integrate with examples offered in Pathway to Peace).
  15. Gender issues in peace studies and initial feminist approach.
  16. The 1325 Resolution Group and its impact.
  17. The three processes that base gender mainstreaming approach in development and peace field.
  18. Arenas of contestation: definition. Provide and discuss a historical example offered by Pathway for Peace.
  19. Basic services provision and corruption. Impact on peace.
  20. Productive and umproductive activities