MariaOlivella Rizza

Ricercatrice di ECONOMIA POLITICA [SECS-P/01]
Email: maria.rizza@unict.it mariaolivellarizza@gmail.com
Orario di ricevimento: contattatemi via email per fissare un appuntamento; vista la presente contingenza straordinaria, è possibile organizzare ricevimenti via Teams, Skype (olivella.rizza) please, book an appointment by e-mail (mariaolivellarizza@gmail.com) to meet me either on teams or in my office. PEACE ECONOMICS STUDENTS with no economics background may fill their knowledge gap with this MOOC, provided by the Erasmus University Rotterdam and authored by Irene van Staveren (whose book is: Economics after the Crisis – an Introduction to Economics from a Pluralist and Global Perspective. Routledge, 2015. Students do not need to buy the book to follow professor van Staveren's MOOC.)


MARIAOLIVELLA RIZZA

12 12 1968 – CATANIA
maria.rizza@unict.it
olivella.rizza@gmail.com
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0939-8345

DIPARTIMENTO DI SCIENZE POLITICHE E SOCIALI
VIA VITTORIO EMANUELE, PALAZZO REBURDONE - CATANIA


CURRICULUM VITAE


Education
Degree in Political Science, University of Catania (1994).
Diploma of the School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University, Bologna Center (1995).
Ph.D in Public Sector Economics, University of Salerno; doctoral dissertation on “Rules, Discretionality and Central Bank Independence: Some Implications for Democracy” (2002).

Positions held
Current: Permanent Researcher and Lecturer in Economics, Department of Political and Social Sciences.
Researcher at the University of Cassino (Department of Economic Sciences) until March 2005.
Supply Lecturer of Microeconomics at the Faculty of Law in Cassino, of Political Economy at the Faculty of Literature in Cassino, of International Monetary Economics at the Faculty of Economics of the Second University of Naples.
Temporary chairs in Economics at the University of Palermo, Cassino, Second University of Naples, University Federico II of Naples (1999-2004).

Research
Since the beginning of my career, interdisciplinarity has been a feature of my research interest and I constantly maintained both a political and a social bent in my economic studies. Currently, my research activity focuses on two fields. I am interested in social entrepreneurship and in those social innovation forms affecting market, state and society in the post-industrial era. I have studied a social capital building experience in Siracusa, Sicily, Italy where a social innovation hub was opened in 2011; I aimed at theorizing possible exit strategies to escape from underdevelopment traps. I am currently studying Libera Terra, a consortium in Sicily which fights poverty and the lack of opportunities and civil rules artificially maintained by Mafiosi. I read the use of market mechanism in the fight against Mafia as a heritage of the Italian civil economy tradition. This research field allows me to dialogue with sociologists, anthropologists, business scholars and philosophers.
The second field of my research is related to those ecofrictions emerging in late industrialization process. Together with anthropologists, economic geographers, linguists I am studying the area around Siracusa, where the largest oil refinery and petrochemicals plant in Europe was settled in the Fifties. In particular, I focus the ecofrictions surrounding the Reserve of Penisola della Maddalena, on the coast south of Siracusa where, following new urban planning in 2007, a protest movement arose in opposition to the project of constructing a resort precisely on the coast. Following Harvey 2012, I read the attempt of private real estate investment as an accumulation of rights (of both landscape’s beauty enjoyment and economic lands’ exploitation) by a dispossession process, covered under a surreptitious rhetoric of ultramodernity and economic growth.

In the past, on the political side I started exploring central bank independence (CBI), and
considered the evolution of the relations between the Bank of Italy and the Italian government.
I examined the consequence of the European integration process for the independence of the Italian central bank, and suggested a political interpretation, today broadly agreed on, of the reasons that moved the Bank of Italy to embrace the European integration process (with Carlo Panico, University Federico II of Naples). I deepened the theoretical foundation of central bank independence and examined its implication for democracy, showing that the apparent contradiction between the two only emerges in the economists' setting of the problem of independence, not in the practice of central banking, nor in political science theories. Together with Sergio Destefanis (University of Salerno) I proposed an interpretation of CBI as a third causal factor of low inflation. We found significative evidence that countries in which societies do not allow political interference on the decisions of key consequence on distribution of wealth and income, show the higher level of CBI.
With reference with the social sciences, in the past, I worked on development theories. I worked with Carlo Panico on a paper on Myrdal where we examined Myrdal’s heterodox view on development processes, based on the idea of cumulative causation. I then worked on some implications of Myrdal's criticism to the theory of utility in his early writings.



visualizza le pubblicazioni
N.B. l'elevato numero di pubblicazioni può incidere sul tempo di caricamento della pagina
ANNO ACCADEMICO 2022/2023

visualizza gli insegnamenti
ANNO ACCADEMICO 2021/2022


ANNO ACCADEMICO 2019/2020


ANNO ACCADEMICO 2018/2019


ANNO ACCADEMICO 2017/2018


ANNO ACCADEMICO 2016/2017


ANNO ACCADEMICO 2015/2016

14/03/2021
International Business - Program

Class 2020-21
International Business (Peace Economics)

Prof. MariaOlivella Rizza
Permanent Researcher in Economics at The University of Catania
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Targets. Students will be familiar with the distribution between productive and unproductive activities, shaped by the structure of the economy and the distinction between contested and uncontested activities.  The course will supply students with an understanding of the ‘positive side’ of peace economics (the study of conflict, which is interpreted as a strategic destructive interaction between rational agents) and the ‘normative side’ of peace economics (the study of economic policies intended to minimize the unproductive components within economies, thereby also reducing the risk of outbreak of actual conflicts). Gender perspective, climate change and food control are key issues to peace process and will be given reasonable space for an intellectual grasp of the main points. Students will also read the 1919 John Maynard Keynes’ fundamental contribution The Economic Consequences of the Peace, to be acquainted with classical textbook.

 15-17 March 2021 - Lessons 1 and 2- Introduction to Peace Economics; Productive and unproductive activities.  – READINGS: Caruso R. (2010), On the nature of peace economics,  Peace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy, 16, No. 2. )

22-24 March 2021 - Lessons 3 and 4 – History of Peace Economics (READINGS: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/239809814_Peace_economists_and_peace_economics)

29-31March 2021  - Lesson 5 and 6 – Economic policies for peace (READINGS:
Caruso R. (2017), Peace economics and peaceful policies, The Economics of Peace and Security Journal, Vol. 12, No. 2 )


12-14 April  2021 - Lessons 6 and 7  – Negative peace and positive peace  (READINGS:
Caruso R. (2015) Beyond deterrence and decline towards a general understanding of peace economics, Rivista Internazionale di Scienze Sociali, 123, No. 1)


19 April 2021 Lesson 8 - Specific issues of peace economics – (READINGS: Buhaug H., (2016), The climate change and the security threaten. Climate Change and Conflict: Taking Stock , in Peace,  Peace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy, Vol. 22, No. 4)
    


21 April 2021 - Lesson 9 – Specific issues of peace economics – The gender perspective (READINGS:
Gizelis T.I. (2018), Systematic Study of Gender, Conflict, and Peace,  Peace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy, 24, No. 4.

26 April 2021 - Lesson 11 - Keynes and The Economic Consequence of Peace ( READINGS:
Keynes, J. M. (1919), The Economic Consequences of the Peace (1 ed.). London: Macmillan & Co., Limited. p. 279. Retrieved 2 June 2016 – via Internet Archive. Chapters 1, 2 and 3)




28 April  2021 - Lesson 12 - Keynes and The Economic Consequence of Peace( READINGS:
Keynes, J. M. (1919), The Economic Consequences of the Peace (1 ed.). London: Macmillan & Co., Limited. p. 279. Retrieved 2 June 2016 – via Internet Archive. Chapters 4 and 5)


3 May 2021 - Lesson 13 – Keynes and The Economic Consequence of Peace ( READINGS:
Keynes, J. M. (1919), The Economic Consequences of the Peace (1 ed.). London: Macmillan & Co., Limited. p. 279. Retrieved 2 June 2016 – via Internet Archive. Chapters 6 and 7)



5 May 2021 - Lesson 14 – Specific issues of peace economics – A lesson to be organized according to students’ suggestions and needs.


10 May 2021 - Lesson 15 - Understanding Trends in Violent Conflict (Readings:
World Bank and United Nations (2018), Pathways for Peace Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflict, The World Bank Group, Washington DC - Chapters 1 and 2)


12 May 2021 Lesson 16- Inequality, exclusion and sense of injustice: why people fight (Readings:
World Bank and United Nations (2018), Pathways for Peace Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflict, The World Bank Group, Washington DC - Chapters 3 and 4)


17 May 2021 - Lesson 17 – Countries’ approach to prevent violent conflict (Readings:
World Bank and United Nations (2018), Pathways for Peace Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflict, The World Bank Group, Washington DC - Chapters 5 and 6)


19 May 2021 - Lesson 18 – Prevention in practice and organizations for prevention (Readings:
World Bank and United Nations (2018), Pathways for Peace Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflict, The World Bank Group, Washington DC - Chapters 7 and 8)








 

14/03/2021
International Business - Program- Criteria

Class 2019-20
International Business
GLOPEM

Prof. MariaOlivella Rizza
Permanent Researcher in Economics at The University of Catania
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Keynes (1919) reading is organised in three worshops: W1, W2, W3.
W1 and W3 will have the same organization and will be led by prof. Rizza.
W2 will be led by Dr Wolfgruber

For W1 and W3, 2 groups (the “Farmers” and the “Dancers”) of three moderators will be encharged of the preliminary supervision of all the posted contributions that for one week the students will be invited to add to a dashboard (to be announced). The contributions (pieces of economic or other literatures, quotations, video, music, art, drawings, etc) are intended as inspirational references, whose relevance with the related reading – chapters 1-2 and chapters 6-7 respectively - should be taken into account, with openness and honesty. The class will be intended  as  a comment to a selection of “the most relevant” contribution posted.

For W2, the class will be split in 6 groups. Each group will provide a written syntesys of the reading of 3,4 and 5. Then a presentation will be offered to the other group of the content. Please, it is important not to share the content of your work earlier than the day of the presentation.

Work: a written summary (two editorial folders) + 4 photos (pertinent to the topics covered) +  2 slides with keyword diagrams

Note: An Editorial Folder is a A4 sheet of 1,800 bars, divided into 30 lines of 60 bars each, where for bars are ALL typed characters, including spaces.


 

Clicca qui per pubblicare un avviso